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Eating Out in Bermuda

Have you ever watched Chef’s Table on Netflix? Each episode features a world-renowned chef at the top of their culinary field. I don’t have a sophisticated palate, but I love food, and each episode leaves me intrigued by chef culture.

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The Annals of Cardiology No.35 | Eating Out in Bermuda

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Have you ever watched Chef’s Table on Netflix? Each episode features a world-renowned chef at the top of their culinary field. I don’t have a sophisticated palate, but I love food, and each episode leaves me intrigued by chef culture. They all seem to be passionate, tortured artists – many heavily tattooed, living life in the fast lane, and obsessed with fresh ingredients. So, a few Sundays ago when I set off to meet Huckleberry’s Chef Matthew at the Rosedon Hotel, I debated whether to mention these impressions. On one hand, I wanted to know if this stereotype was true, but I also knew chefs sometimes had tempers and always had knives. I decided to be polite.

The real reason I was meeting Chef Matthew had to do with a study that appeared in the Lancet a couple months ago. The Lancet is one of the world’s leading medical journals, and the study was funded by Bill and Melinda Gates, so it was a big deal. It was called the Global Burden of Disease Study, and it aimed to document what people die from, and why. No surprise that cardiovascular (heart and blood vessels) disease was number one: in 2017, 10 million deaths were due to cardiovascular disease, less than a million (913,000) were from cancer, and less than half a million (339,000) were from Type 2 diabetes. The big shocker was that for the first time, a poor diet was identified as the number one health risk around the world. Put simply, our diets are killing us.

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